Refresh Your Drive - Rest 15 minutes Every 2 hours

Refresh Your Drive - Rest 15 minutes Every 2 hours

Refresh Your Drive at Easter - Channel 9 report

Refresh Your Drive at Easter - Channel 9 report

Country Roads Need Safer Drivers - Chris's Story

Country Roads Need Safer Drivers - Chris's Story

Video

Shaun's Story

Video

Shaun's Story

On The Road with Keith Conlon - Police Road Safety Centre

On The Road with Keith Conlon - Police Road Safety Centre

Wet weather safety tips

Wet weather safety tips

MAC has the following tips for safer road use during wet weather:

  1.  Drive to the conditions, and lower your speed in cases where visibility is poor or roads are slippery;
  2. Keep a safe distance between yourself and the vehicle in front – count at least three seconds;
  3. Check your tyres – if they have less tread on them, the tyres cannot displace enough water, which may make the vehicle aquaplane;
  4. Check for wear and tear on wiper blades and replace them as soon as they start to smear rather than clean windows;
  5. Check your car’s lights and indicators to make sure all are working properly and always turn on headlights in wet or foggy conditions;
  6. Cyclists should use their lights during the day as well as at night, and wearing florescent and reflective clothing will make it easy for drivers to see you;
  7. Pedestrians should always cross at the lights and be aware that drivers could have difficulty seeing them
Nine News Report

Rift between road users

Nine News Report

Rift between road users

Back to school

Tips for parents dropping kids off at school

Back to school

Tips for parents dropping kids off at school

Motor Accident Commission (MAC) is reminding motorists to take extra care on the roads as children around the State return to school.

Motorists need to look out for children on the roads, some of whom may be walking or cycling to school for the first time.

Parents can help prepare their children for the journey to school by talking through the importance of being safe on the roads before they head back to school.

Parents should stress how to cross the road safely without being distracted by friends and mobile phones.

More Information >

When to use your fog lights

When to use your fog lights

Fog lights are designed to be used in fog or other hazardous weather conditions causing reduced visibility.

When fog lights are used in clear weather conditions the glare from these powerful lights can make driving difficult for approaching traffic.

Did you know that it is an offence to use fog lights when not driving in fog or other hazardous weather conditions and can incur a penalty of $218?

More Information

Australian Road Rules

Road Traffic (Miscellaneous) Regulations (expiation fees)

Fatigue

Fatigue

Fatigue is estimated to be a contributing factor in approximately 30% of fatal crashes and up to 15% of serious injuries. It also represents significant social and economic costs to the community in relation to road crashes.

Driver fatigue can be just as deadly as drink driving or speeding.

The problem with fatigue is that it slowly develops and drivers often don't realise they're too tired to drive safely.

So if you're on a long journey, it's important to take a break every two hours to prevent fatigue, even if you're not feeling tired.

Four fatal crashes this weekend

Four fatal crashes this weekend

Avoiding Fatigue

Avoiding Fatigue

There are a number of simple ways to avoid driver fatigue:

  • Plan your trip with a good night's sleep (7-8 hours of uninterrupted sleep) the night before.
  • Plan not to travel for more than 8-10 hours in any one day. The longer you drive the more you must fight fatigue.
  • Plan your trip to include regular breaks every two hours for 15 minutes or more.
  • Plan to start your trip early in the day and try not to drive into the night.
  • Don't push yourself.
  • When you stop, get out of the car, stretch and walk around for a while or have a nap.
  • Don't rely on coffee and energy drinks. Water will keep you hydrated.
  • Share the driving if you can. Passengers can tell you if you are looking tired or showing signs of tiredness. Driving with a friend can also make it a more enjoyable trip.
  • Don't overeat.
  • Don't drink alcohol before driving or during rest breaks. Alcohol can make you feel tired more quickly, as well as putting you at risk of being over the legal limit.
  • Check the labels on prescription medicines that may affect your alertness or cause drowsiness. If this is the case, contact your pharmacist or local GP for advice.

If you rest every two hours for at least 15 minutes driver fatigue can be avoided and you will have a safer, more enjoyable trip.